Our Restoration Projects

A Rocha works throughout the Little Campbell River watershed, primarily with landowners on private land, to restore habitat. This includes activities like:

  • Removing invasive species like Himalayan blackberry (Rubus armeniacus), reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinaceae), golden archangel (Lamium galeobdolon), scotch broom (Cytisus scoparius), English ivy (Hedera helix) and policeman’s helmet (Impatiens glandulifera) in the watershed.
  • Fencing out cattle and horses from sensitive riparian habitats.
  • Putting natural meanders and structures back into the river where previously removed.
  • Implementing sediment control structures at high-risk junctions.
  • Aiding other organizations that are working to restore habitat in the watershed.
  • Planting native species like salmonberry (Rubus spectabilis), vine maple (Acer circinatum), sitka willow (Salix sitchensis), garry oak (Quercus garryana) and western red cedar (Thuja plicata).
  • Creating new wetlands for fish and wildlife habitat.

Why Restore Habitat?

Habitat restoration is an important tool to address ecological degradation. In particular, the restoration of wetlands and riparian areas is helping to reverse long-term trends in habitat loss, which have occurred over the last century. Restoration of these sensitive ecosystems can provide the much needed boost to local flora and fauna, as well as contribute positively to water quality.

Reversing trends in habitat loss

  • Habitat restoration is an intentional activity that initiates or accelerates the recovery of an ecosystem with respect to its health, stability and sustainability (Society for Ecological Restoration 2004). Restoration ecology assumes that habitat degradation is reversible to an extent. Thus, targeted restoration efforts are used to promote ecosystem recovery, resilience and associated biodiversity. Restoration activities can include:
  • Control of introduced, invasive species of plants or animals.
  • Assisted re-vegetation/re-establishment of native species.
  • Control, reduction or elimination of specific adverse impacts such as polluted run-off.
  • Re-establishment and/or increasing complexity of habitat structures including physical, biological or chemical composition. This may include acts like the addition of in-stream wood and rocks, or moving the stream altogether.
Upcoming dates

Restoration Saturdays

Restoration Saturdays are a great way to learn practical skills in creation care. Join our conservation team for a morning of hands-on habitat restoration work.
Upcoming dates

Give where needed most

$250
$150
$100
$50
Other
$250
$150
$100
$50
Other